What Resolution Should My Files Be?

Files should be submitted at least at 300 DPI. Submitting a file less than 300 DPI might cause it to look pixelated. When submitting a file at a higher resolution than 300 DPI it generally will make the file much larger in size but it will not make it look any better.

Images for offset/digital printing should be of 300 dpi, but you can get away with as low as 220 dpi if that’s all you’ve got. Any more dpi is a waste and just makes the files size larger. Under 220 dpi and you will start to see the pixels in the print.

Remember recommended dpi refers to the effective resolution, not the resolution number given in Photoshop. If you have a 300 dpi, 5×7 image that you use in a layout at 200% the effective resolution is only 150 dpi, not enough for good print quality. On the flip side, if you have a large 72dpi image (meant for web) that you scale down to 25% of its original size; the effective resolution is 4 times the file’s dpi This means your document resolution should be set to 300 dpi to allow for the extra resolution needed for the images. Most layout programs include the dpi settings in the preferences for the program (edit>preferences) or, the resolution is set when you make a new document (file>new document).

What kinds of files does brevoprints accept?

We accepts print-ready files in the following format

  • Adobe Acrobat Document (*.pdf) (recommended)
  • Adobe Illustrator Artwork 8 or higher – (*.ai) – All images embedded and fonts outlined.
  • Adobe Photoshop Image (*.psd) – All layers flattened and all fonts outlined

Your images and designs should be saved to 300 ppi at 100% of the dimensions at which they will print to ensure high quality printing results.

We can also print raster images (.jpegs) independent of the application program used to create such designs if they are submitted at high-quality, uncompressed 300 dpi resolution, 8 bit, CMYK color mode. We can not guarantee files created in MS-Word or MS-Publisher will produce high-quality images and text.

Please note that if you have an artwork file in any other format (e.g., word document), we encourage you to create a PDF file (if you can) and then upload it to us. If you cannot do that, we can do that for you.

File format specifies how information is organized and file type. File formats accepted by brevoprints: JPEG, GIF, PSD (Photoshop), PDF, EPS.

brevoprints uses a PDF workflow so we prefer submitted files to be PDF.

 

Bleed Requirements

Full bleed is printing from edge to edge of a document. Full bleed requires a minimum of 1/8″ (0.125″) on all sides of the artwork to ensure accurate cutting (e.g., artwork for a 5″x8″ postcard should extend to 5.25″ x 8.25″). If your image has a white border on all four sides, bleeds are recommended but not required. If your image is not white on all four sides, you must include bleeds in print-ready files.

Preparing files with Custom Fonts:

There are few ways to deal with this problem:

  1. If the file does not require editing and will “print as is” then outline (convert to path) all fonts. This will convert the fonts to images and embed them in to the document. Save the file with a separate name; if the file is saved on top of the original file then you will not be able to make any edits.
  2. The font file can be sent separately along with the file created in the native program. Make sure there is no licensing issue with the fonts used as brevoprints is not responsible for copyright infringement. Most manufacturers are fine with their fonts being sent to the printers as we need these to print them properly. Furthermore, it is not possible for brevoprints to buy and stock each and every font available.

Converting Fonts to Outlines

1) Select text

2) In menu bar (Type> Create Outlines)

 

How to convert colors from RGB to CMYK

CMYK color mode is required for printing your files in full color. If your file was created in RGB color mode, then there will be a color shift when converting from RGB to CMYK. So, if you have designed the files in RGB or Pantone Colors, then they will be converted to CMYK space automatically by our PDF workflow. But to avoid color shift due to this conversion it is advisable that you create your artwork in CMYK mode from the start. 

When making a new document, select CMYK color mode. This will make the colors you have chosen on screen look the same way on paper when printed because printers go through a four color process which involves the colors (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, Key=black).

For Illustrator:

To Convert Colors to CMYK: Go to File>Document Color mode>CMYK Color

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For Photoshop:

To Convert Colors to CMYK go to Menu > Image> Mode > CMYK color

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Another way to make sure the colors are accurate is:

When you open the color picker (CLUT), pick a color. If there is a yellow yield icon that pops up next to the OK button, then the color you picked is not a safe color to choose. The warning icon means that the printer is not capable of printing that exact color. Colors with a warning icon are out of gaumut and will print as a similar color, which is most likely what is wanted. Colors that do not have a yellow yield icon will result in better color accuracy.

Example of Yellow Yield Icon:

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For the best color accuracy it is recommended that a hard copy proof is purchased with the order. Even with a hard copy proof colors may only be a 90% match.

 

How to ensure there are no missing images

Converting a file to PDF eliminates the need to embed images, which is one of the reasons why we prefer PDF files. If sending files in a native format like Illustrator, Photoshop, or InDesign please make sure to embed all images instead of linking them.

 

Creating a print ready file in Adobe InDesign

Step 1: Click File “export

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Step 2: Select the Folder you want to save in and click “Save”

Step 3: In the “Save Adobe PDF” window in the “General” section select the drop down menu marked “Adobe PDF Preset” and scroll down to [Press Quality] as shown below.

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Step 4: In the “Save Adobe PDF” window in the “General” section select the drop down menu marked “Standard” and select the “PDF/X-1a:2001” option as shown below.

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Step 5: In the “Save Adobe PDF” window in the “Compression” section, makes sure the text fields in “Color Images” read the same as the image below.

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Step 6:  In the “Save Adobe PDF” window in the “Marks and Bleeds” section under “marks” click the box next to “crop marks”. Under “bleeds” Select the link icon in the middle of the 4 text fields constraining the proportions and set them all to “0.125in”. Once you select the link icon, if you set one text field, the other 3 will change as well as shown in the image below.

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Step 7:  In the “Save Adobe PDF” window in the “Output” section, click the “Ink Manager” button.

Step 8: In the “Ink Manager” window check the “All spots to process” box at the bottom left hand corner and click okay as shown in the image below.

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 Step 9:  In the “Save Adobe PDF” window in the “Advanced” section, makes sure the text field under “fonts” for “Subset fonts…” is set to “0%” same as the image below.

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Step 10: Once you have completed step 9, click “Save PDF” at the bottom right hand corner of the window.

 

Creating a print ready file in Adobe Illustrator

Step 1: Click “File” then scroll down to “save as”

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Step 2: Select the Folder you want to save in and click “Save”.

Step 3: In the “Save Adobe PDF” window in the “General” section select the drop down menu marked “Adobe PDF Preset” and scroll down to [Press Quality] as shown below.

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Step 4: In the “Save Adobe PDF” window in the “General” section select the drop down menu marked “Standard” and select the “PDF/X-1a:2001” option as shown below.

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Step 5: In the “Save Adobe PDF” window in the “Marks and Bleeds” section under “marks” click the box next to “trim marks”. Under “bleeds” Select the link icon in the middle of the 4 text fields constraining the proportions and set them all to “0.125in” as shown in the image below.

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Step 6: In the “Save Adobe PDF” window in the “Output” section, makes sure the options under “color” and “PDF/X” read the same as the image below.

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Step 7: In the “Save Adobe PDF” window in the “Advanced” section, makes sure the text field under “fonts” for “Subset fonts…” is set to “0%” same as the image below.

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Step 8:  Once you have completed step 7, click “Save PDF” at the bottom right hand corner of the window.